Items filtered by date: April 2024

Incorporating foot stretches into your post-run routine offers a multitude of benefits, helping your feet recover from the demands of running while reducing the risk of future injury. Toe curls, where you curl your toes downward and then upward, help strengthen the muscles in your feet and improve flexibility. Ankle rotations, performed by gently rotating your ankles in clockwise and counterclockwise motions, enhance ankle mobility and reduce stiffness. Additionally, plantar fascia stretches, achieved by gently pulling your toes towards you to stretch the arch of your foot, alleviate tension in the plantar fascia, and help prevent conditions like plantar fasciitis. Calf stretches, targeting the muscles in the lower leg, improve range of motion and prevent tightness during running. Finally, Achilles tendon stretches, where you lean against a wall with one foot back and gently press the heel towards the ground, increase flexibility and reduce strain on the Achilles tendon. By incorporating these stretches into your post-run routine, you can optimize performance, prevent injuries, and promote overall foot health. If you have endured a foot injury from running, it is suggested that you visit a podiatrist who can offer you appropriate treatment options, in addition to suggesting foot stretches that are best for you.

Why Stretching Is Important for Your Feet

Stretching the feet is a great way to prevent injuries. If you have any concerns with your feet consult with Philip Hahn, DPM from Advanced Foot & Ankle Center. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

Stretching the Feet

Stretching the muscles in the foot is an important part in any physical activity. Feet that are tight can lead to less flexibility and make you more prone to injury. One of the most common forms of foot pain, plantar fasciitis, can be stretched out to help ease the pain. Stretching can not only ease pain from plantar fasciitis but also prevent it as well. However, it is important to see a podiatrist first to determine if stretching is right for you. Podiatrists can also recommend other ways to stretch your feet. Once you know whether stretching is right for you, here are some excellent stretches you can do.

  • Using a foam roller or any cylindrical object (a water bottle or soda can will do), roll the object under your foot back and forth. You should also exert pressure on the object. Be sure to do this to both feet for a minute. Do this exercise three times each.
  • Similar to the previous exercise, take a ball, such as a tennis ball, and roll it under your foot while seated and exert pressure on it.
  • Grab a resistance band or towel and take a seat. If you are using a towel, fold it length wise. Next put either one between the ball of your foot and heel and pull with both hands on each side towards you. Hold this for 15 seconds and then switch feet. Do this three times for each foot.
  • Finally hold your big toe while crossing one leg over the other. Pull the toe towards you and hold for 15 seconds. Once again do this three times per foot.

It is best to go easy when first stretching your foot and work your way up. If your foot starts hurting, stop exercising to ice and rest the foot. It is advised that you then see a podiatrist for help.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our offices located in Texarkana and, Pittsburg, TX . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Peripheral neuropathy refers to damage to the peripheral nerves, resulting in symptoms such as numbness, tingling, and weakness, often starting in the feet and hands. This condition can be caused by various factors, including diabetes, infections, injuries, and certain medications. Individuals with diabetes are particularly susceptible to neuropathy due to prolonged high blood sugar levels damaging nerves over time. Neuropathy affects people of all ages, though it is more common in older adults. Treatment aims to manage symptoms and address underlying causes. This may include medications to relieve pain and discomfort, and lifestyle changes, such as maintaining healthy blood sugar levels. If you suffer from peripheral neuropathy, it is suggested that you schedule an appointment with a podiatrist who can help you by providing guidance and foot care tailored to your individual needs.

Neuropathy

Neuropathy can be a potentially serious condition, especially if it is left undiagnosed. If you have any concerns that you may be experiencing nerve loss in your feet, consult with Philip Hahn, DPM from Advanced Foot & Ankle Center. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment for neuropathy.

What Is Neuropathy?

Neuropathy is a condition that leads to damage to the nerves in the body. Peripheral neuropathy, or neuropathy that affects your peripheral nervous system, usually occurs in the feet. Neuropathy can be triggered by a number of different causes. Such causes include diabetes, infections, cancers, disorders, and toxic substances.

Symptoms of Neuropathy Include:

  • Numbness
  • Sensation loss
  • Prickling and tingling sensations
  • Throbbing, freezing, burning pains
  • Muscle weakness

Those with diabetes are at serious risk due to being unable to feel an ulcer on their feet. Diabetics usually also suffer from poor blood circulation. This can lead to the wound not healing, infections occurring, and the limb may have to be amputated.

Treatment

To treat neuropathy in the foot, podiatrists will first diagnose the cause of the neuropathy. Figuring out the underlying cause of the neuropathy will allow the podiatrist to prescribe the best treatment, whether it be caused by diabetes, toxic substance exposure, infection, etc. If the nerve has not died, then it’s possible that sensation may be able to return to the foot.

Pain medication may be issued for pain. Electrical nerve stimulation can be used to stimulate nerves. If the neuropathy is caused from pressure on the nerves, then surgery may be necessary.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our offices located in Texarkana and, Pittsburg, TX . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Tuesday, 02 April 2024 00:00

Foot Corns

Corns on the feet, medically termed keratotic lesions, are areas of thickened skin caused by repeated friction or pressure. They commonly occur on weight-bearing areas like the toes and soles of the feet. Symptoms can include localized pain or tenderness, a hardened or raised bump, and sometimes inflammation or redness. Older individuals are more prone to developing corns due to factors like reduced skin elasticity and altered foot mechanics. There are three main types of corns. Hard corns are small, dense, and are usually found on bony areas. Soft corns are moist and typically form between toes where the skin is moist. Seed corns are tiny and appear on non-weight-bearing areas. Diagnosis is typically made based on clinical examination. Management involves relieving pressure on the affected area, wearing properly fitting footwear, using protective pads or cushions, and sometimes, having the corn removed. If you have persistent or painful corns, it is suggested that you schedule an appointment with a podiatrist for treatment.

Corns can make walking very painful and should be treated immediately. If you have questions regarding your feet and ankles, contact Philip Hahn, DPM of Advanced Foot & Ankle Center. Our doctor will treat your foot and ankle needs.

Corns: What Are They? And How Do You Get Rid of Them?
Corns are thickened areas on the skin that can become painful. They are caused by excessive pressure and friction on the skin. Corns press into the deeper layers of the skin and are usually round in shape.

Ways to Prevent Corns
There are many ways to get rid of painful corns such as:

  • Wearing properly fitting shoes that have been measured by a professional
  • Wearing shoes that are not sharply pointed or have high heels
  • Wearing only shoes that offer support

Treating Corns

Although most corns slowly disappear when the friction or pressure stops, this isn’t always the case. Consult with your podiatrist to determine the best treatment option for your case of corns.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our offices located in Texarkana and, Pittsburg, TX . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Understanding Corns and Calluses

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