Tuesday, 21 May 2024 00:00

Numbness in the big toe can be a perplexing sensation, ranging from a slight tingling to a complete loss of feeling. While big toe numbness might seem like a minor inconvenience at first, it could be a sign of underlying issues that need attention. One of the most common causes is wearing shoes that are too tight. Footwear that constricts the toes can impede circulation and lead to numbness. Conditions that involve stiffness in the joint at the base of the big toe are often accompanied by bone spurs that may press on nerves, causing numbness. Nerve damage, often associated with conditions like diabetes or autoimmune diseases, also can result in numbness, tingling, or pain in the toes. A bunion, which is a bony bump at the base of the big toe can exert pressure on surrounding nerves and lead to numbness. Exposure to freezing temperatures can damage tissues, causing numbness in the toes. Finally, Raynaud’s disease, a vascular condition that results in spasms in small arteries of the feet, can lead to numbness and discoloration in the toes, particularly in response to cold or stress. If you are experiencing persistent numbness in your big toe, it is suggested that you schedule an appointment with a podiatrist for a thorough exam and treatment options based on the results. 

Neuropathy

Neuropathy can be a potentially serious condition, especially if it is left undiagnosed. If you have any concerns that you may be experiencing nerve loss in your feet, consult with Philip Hahn, DPM from Advanced Foot & Ankle Center. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment for neuropathy.

What Is Neuropathy?

Neuropathy is a condition that leads to damage to the nerves in the body. Peripheral neuropathy, or neuropathy that affects your peripheral nervous system, usually occurs in the feet. Neuropathy can be triggered by a number of different causes. Such causes include diabetes, infections, cancers, disorders, and toxic substances.

Symptoms of Neuropathy Include:

  • Numbness
  • Sensation loss
  • Prickling and tingling sensations
  • Throbbing, freezing, burning pains
  • Muscle weakness

Those with diabetes are at serious risk due to being unable to feel an ulcer on their feet. Diabetics usually also suffer from poor blood circulation. This can lead to the wound not healing, infections occurring, and the limb may have to be amputated.

Treatment

To treat neuropathy in the foot, podiatrists will first diagnose the cause of the neuropathy. Figuring out the underlying cause of the neuropathy will allow the podiatrist to prescribe the best treatment, whether it be caused by diabetes, toxic substance exposure, infection, etc. If the nerve has not died, then it’s possible that sensation may be able to return to the foot.

Pain medication may be issued for pain. Electrical nerve stimulation can be used to stimulate nerves. If the neuropathy is caused from pressure on the nerves, then surgery may be necessary.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our offices located in Texarkana and, Pittsburg, TX . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Tuesday, 14 May 2024 00:00

Gout, often termed the disease of kings, is a form of inflammatory arthritis caused by the accumulation of uric acid crystals in the joints, leading to intense pain and swelling. Contrary to popular belief, gout can affect anyone, regardless of social status or dietary habits. The condition typically manifests in sudden, severe attacks, commonly affecting the big toe. Factors contributing to gout include genetics, a diet rich in purines that are found in red meat, seafood, and alcohol, obesity, and certain medical conditions like hypertension or kidney disease. Despite its historical association with indulgence, gout is a legitimate medical concern that requires proper management and treatment. Without intervention, recurrent gout attacks can lead to joint damage and chronic pain, significantly impacting one's quality of life. If you have severe pain in your big toe and surrounding areas, it is strongly suggested that you seek advice from a podiatrist who can help you find relief and management methods.

Gout is a painful condition that can be treated. If you are seeking treatment, contact Philip Hahn, DPM from Advanced Foot & Ankle Center. Our doctor will treat your foot and ankle needs.

What Is Gout?

Gout is a form of arthritis that is characterized by sudden, severe attacks of pain, redness, and tenderness in the joints. The condition usually affects the joint at the base of the big toe. A gout attack can occur at any random time, such as the middle of the night while you are asleep.

Symptoms

  • Intense Joint Pain - Usually around the large joint of your big toe, and it most severe within the first four to twelve hours
  • Lingering Discomfort - Joint discomfort may last from a few days to a few weeks
  • Inflammation and Redness -Affected joints may become swollen, tender, warm and red
  • Limited Range of Motion - May experience a decrease in joint mobility

Risk Factors

  • Genetics - If family members have gout, you’re more likely to have it
  • Medications - Diuretic medications can raise uric acid levels
  • Gender/Age - Gout is more common in men until the age of 60. It is believed that estrogen protects women until that point
  • Diet - Eating red meat and shellfish increases your risk
  • Alcohol - Having more than two alcoholic drinks per day increases your risk
  • Obesity - Obese people are at a higher risk for gout

Prior to visiting your podiatrist to receive treatment for gout, there are a few things you should do beforehand. If you have gout you should write down your symptoms--including when they started and how often you experience them, important medical information you may have, and any questions you may have. Writing down these three things will help your podiatrist in assessing your specific situation so that he or she may provide the best route of treatment for you.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our offices located in Texarkana and, Pittsburg, TX . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Tuesday, 07 May 2024 00:00

Diabetic foot ulcers pose a serious risk to those with diabetes, often flying under the radar until they become severe. The condition arises due to poor blood circulation and nerve damage, making it less likely for individuals to notice when their feet are injured. These ulcers typically occur on the soles of the feet or pressure points like the heels and toes, where friction and pressure are high. After a podiatrist removes dead tissue and cleanses the affected area, it is important to keep weight off the foot to prevent further complications and promote healing. Prevention is key, involving daily foot inspections, proper footwear, regular foot hygiene, and blood sugar management. Consulting a podiatrist is essential for diabetic patients to receive specialized care and guidance in preventing and managing foot ulcers. With their expertise, individuals can better safeguard their feet and overall well-being, avoiding the potentially devastating consequences of diabetic foot ulcers. If you have diabetes, it is strongly suggested that you add a podiatrist to your healthcare team.

Wound care is an important part in dealing with diabetes. If you have diabetes and a foot wound or would like more information about wound care for diabetics, consult with Philip Hahn, DPM from Advanced Foot & Ankle Center. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

What Is Wound Care?

Wound care is the practice of taking proper care of a wound. This can range from the smallest to the largest of wounds. While everyone can benefit from proper wound care, it is much more important for diabetics. Diabetics often suffer from poor blood circulation which causes wounds to heal much slower than they would in a non-diabetic. 

What Is the Importance of Wound Care?

While it may not seem apparent with small ulcers on the foot, for diabetics, any size ulcer can become infected. Diabetics often also suffer from neuropathy, or nerve loss. This means they might not even feel when they have an ulcer on their foot. If the wound becomes severely infected, amputation may be necessary. Therefore, it is of the upmost importance to properly care for any and all foot wounds.

How to Care for Wounds

The best way to care for foot wounds is to prevent them. For diabetics, this means daily inspections of the feet for any signs of abnormalities or ulcers. It is also recommended to see a podiatrist several times a year for a foot inspection. If you do have an ulcer, run the wound under water to clear dirt from the wound; then apply antibiotic ointment to the wound and cover with a bandage. Bandages should be changed daily and keeping pressure off the wound is smart. It is advised to see a podiatrist, who can keep an eye on it.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our offices located in Texarkana and, Pittsburg, TX . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Tuesday, 30 April 2024 00:00

Ledderhose's disease, more commonly known as plantar fibromatosis, was named after George Ledderhose who first described it in 1894. It is a rare condition characterized by the growth of fibrous tissue in the plantar fascia, the ligament connecting the heel to the toes. This leads to the formation of nodules or lumps on the bottom of the foot, causing pain and stiffness. While the exact cause is unknown, factors such as genetics, trauma, or certain medical conditions may contribute to its development. Ledderhose's disease predominantly affects middle-aged and older adults, with men being more commonly affected than women. Treatment options for Ledderhose's disease range from conservative measures like custom-made orthotics to more invasive interventions, such as steroid injections or surgery to remove the nodules. Outcomes vary, and recurrence is possible. If you have lumps on the soles of your feet, it is suggested that you schedule an appointment with a podiatrist for an accurate diagnosis and personalized treatment.

A plantar fibroma may disrupt your daily activities. If you have any concerns, contact Philip Hahn, DPM of Advanced Foot & Ankle Center. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Plantar Fibroma

A plantar fibroma is a fibrous knot in the arch of the foot. It is embedded in the plantar fascia which is a band of tissue that extends from the heel to the toes along the bottom of the foot. There can be multiple plantar fibromas in the feet at the same time. There are no known causes for this condition. If you have a plantar fibroma, there will be a bump in the arch of your foot that cannot be missed. Any associated pain is most often due to a shoe rubbing against the nodule. Non-surgical options, such as steroid injections, physical therapy, and orthotics should be tried first. Surgery is a last resort and is the only thing that will remove a plantar fibroma entirely. Consult with a podiatrist for a proper diagnosis and to determine the treatment regimen that is right for you.

What Causes a Plantar Fibroma?

While there are no specific causes identified, a plantar fibroma can possibly come from genetic predisposition or the formation of scar tissue that forms from healing the tears in the plantar fascia.

What Are the Symptoms of a Plantar Fibroma?

There will be a noticeable lump in the arch of the foot that may or may not cause pain. If pain is felt, it is typically because a shoe is rubbing up against the lump or when walking or standing barefoot.

Treatment and Prevention

A plantar fibroma will not disappear without treatment, but it can get smaller and be a non-issue. If pain persists, a podiatrist examines the foot and when the arch of the foot is pressed, pain can be felt down to the toes. An MRI or biopsy might be performed to help diagnose or evaluate the plantar fibroma. The following non-surgical options are generally enough to reduce the size and pain of these nodules:

  • Steroid injections
  • Orthotics
  • Physical therapy to help apply anti-inflammatory creams on the bump 

Surgery is considered if the mass increases in size and the patient continues to feel pain after non-surgical methods are tried.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our offices located in Texarkana and, Pittsburg, TX . We offer the newest diagnostic tools and technology to treat your foot and ankle needs.

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